I think Tom is correct. A corporation exists for whatever reason. It's purpose is to fulfill it's charter -- i.e., articles of incorporation.
A corporation is a "creation" of the state, when it is a legally recognized entity.

This was a big point some years ago when the state (Nebraska) closed down a church because it refused to ask permission to the state for its daycare center or school or something on principle. The pastor was even jailed on contempt for some days, until the judge got a fit of morality and called in this pastor to explain the facts of life to him.

The judge just pointed to the church's charter: "The...Church, a Corporation of the State of Nebraska" or some such legalese. That is, a "corporation of the state"...

The pastor and church quickly dissolved that corporation, and also ended its 501c3 status (which went away along with that), and became an "unlicensed church" or something like that, a non-corporate religious entity that had thereby ended its legal declaration of subservience to the state via incorporation.

It's an application of the First Amendment under the Constitution of the U.S...

But the case of commercial corps is different....

--Alan


This thread ...

Replies:

Follow On AppleNews
Return to Archive home page | Return to MIDRANGE.COM home page

This mailing list archive is Copyright 1997-2020 by midrange.com and David Gibbs as a compilation work. Use of the archive is restricted to research of a business or technical nature. Any other uses are prohibited. Full details are available on our policy page. If you have questions about this, please contact [javascript protected email address].