I ran this on the host:
ENDNFSSVR SERVER(*ALL)
STRNFSSVR SERVER(*ALL)

When I run this on the host:
ping '10.10.206.129'
it fails.
I suspect the network guy figured that '206' is all backplane and doesn't
need to be put in the routers and/or switches.

Makes me wonder if I should pursue this more vigoursly.
<snip>
If you use all Vlans on the backplane of the system you'll eliminate quite
a
bit trouble.
</snip>
Like, should I reverse this change, bounce NFS, and try it again? Heck,
try the ping?
<snip>
Internet address . . . . . . 10.10.206.129
Gateway router address . . . 10.10.206.1
Subnet mask . . . . . . . . . 255.255.255.0
to
Internet address . . . . . . 10.10.6.130
Gateway router address . . . 10.10.6.1
Subnet mask . . . . . . . . . 255.255.254.0
*Note: we use subnet 255.255.254.0 for our regular lan traffic.
</snip>
I did not put that original '10.10.206.1' in there. It put that in
itself. Is this like a dummy router vlan uses? Or does it assume that I
have a router with that IP address? It kinda follows our standards.
Should I be able to ping '10.10.206.1'? Right now I can't ping that from
guest or host.

Changing the default of HALF duplex to full duplex on the SST service lan
isn't a problem, is it? They match on both the host and guest.


Rob Berendt

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