• Subject: Re: Unix Comparison
  • From: rob@xxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Wed, 10 Jan 2001 17:14:31 -0500


One of the things that OS/400 does is it's single level storage.  Among
other things this allows one object to be spread out among several disks.
Unix as a general rule does not.  I know that IBM's flavor of Unix, AIX,
does allow this.

Packed, zone and what not are functions of the database, not the operating
system.  OS/400 comes packed with it's own DB, DB2 or whatever it's
marketed now as.  In Unix you purchase the database separately.  And in
theory you base your DB selection on what package you are looking at.
Although I suppose there are bigots which select packages based on what DB
it uses.  The DB can make a difference.  Give you an example.  SSA looked
at using real date fields in their newer versions of BPCS.  However at the
time they were attempting to market to the Unix world.  At that same time
date fields were iffy based on which database you selected.  Some, didn't
support date fields, while some were quite buggy.  I have no more details
than that.  This was provided by an individual which worked for a company
contracted by SSA to help develop BPCS.

Every version of Unix has it's own set of 'extensions'.  IBM tries not to
push SQL beyond what is acceptable by the standards committee.  I am not so
sure that other databases follow this.  These extensions surely have a
bearing on portability.

Partitioning.  As OS/400 has Netserver to support NT shares, Unix has a
like function, I think it is called SMB or some such thing.  As far as
supporting NT itself we all know that 400 does this by just slapping a PC
inside the box that uses OS/400 disk, so would that really be partitioning?

Now I've tried to avoid anything controversial.  I've also tried to avoid
anything of which I know nothing about.  Trust me, I know almost nothing
about Unix.

Can anyone say when there what year there first was a 'working' version of
Unix?

Rob Berendt

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Thanks Scott, I'm becoming enlightened already.

The comparison I'm seeking is in the area of limitation (storage), data
acceptance (packed, Zoned etc), reliability (AS/400 is known to be #1 in
this area), openness (cross platform flexibility), portability (can any
programming language be use on platform), midrange (AS/400 is a midrange),
Server capability (AS/400 can be partitioned for NT, OS400 etc).  I hope I
make myself clear.

Anyone else can jump in with their take.

Oludare


----- Original Message -----
From: "Scott Klement" <klemscot@klements.com>
To: <MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com>
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2001 1:31 PM
Subject: Re: Unix Comparison


>
> UNIX is an operating system.  There are many operating systems that are
> "based-on" UNIX, or are "UNIX-like", in addition to the official "UNIX".
> (You'll hear these referred to as "flavors of UNIX")  These include BSD,
> HPUX, AIX, Solaris, SCO UNIX, Unixware, Linux, and many, many more.
>
> There is some hardware that is specifically designed for UNIX-type
> operating systems.  One example would be IBM's RS/6000 line of computers
> which is designed to run AIX (IBM's flavor of UNIX)
>
> HP also makes UNIX servers, they have their own flavor of UNIX called
> "HPUX".
>
> UNIX can also be run on other machines.  For example, the PC can run
> numerous flavors of UNIX.  Linux is the most popular, there are at least
a
> dozen flavors of Linux alone...   Then there's BSD, I know of 4 flavors
of
> BSD for the PC...   Sun makes Solaris for the PC, though I've never tried
> it...  The list goes on...
>
> Its very hard to compare UNIX to OS/400 without having a better idea of
> what you specifically are looking to find out...?
>
>
> On Wed, 10 Jan 2001, Oludare Ogunmadewa wrote:
>
> > Hello guys,
> >
> > I'm researching different systems in comparison to UNIX.  I need some
> > education in the following areas:
> >
> > Is UNIX a hardware or software and what if is the software. How does
> > Unix compares with HPxxxx, AS/400, PC and what other platforms is in
> > the same category as Unix.  What does Unix has in advantage to all its
> > competitor and what is it lacking.
> >
> > Thanks for any of your input.
> >
> > Oludare
> >
>
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