Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen wrote:
> One of the issues that always crop up in CS academia is that their
approach to programming must be trained and self-taught programmers have a lot of habits which does not fit well in this dogma and hence must be unlearned.

Even self-taught programmers can be plenty dogmatic. Witness the "Cycle Wars" on the RPG list.

Moreover, programmers who learn only one language, particularly when it's the "latest, greatest language to render all other languages obsolete," tend to be very dogmatic about that language being a panacea.

It is, of course, true that having a lot of languages under your belt does not, in and of itself, make one a better programmer. By analogy, you can give a bad carpenter a set of the very latest tools, including nail guns and every new high-power cordless power tool there is, and you just end up with a bad carpenter who's likely to hurt somebody, while if you give a good carpenter nothing but a hammer, a hand saw, and a bit brace with assorted augers, he or she will be perfectly capable of building you a house.

But the more programming languages you know, the easier it is to learn languages you've never been exposed to, and the more likely you are to see which language is best, among those available in a given situation, for the problem at hand.


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