"I'm trying to understand what the advantage of using a library list is?
If the program has to be aware of the library (regardless of whether it
gets this info from a constant in the program or whether it reads it
from a file, data area, parameter, etc) then why not just specify the
libraries explictly when opening the file?  What good is the library
list?"

On shared applications, you do not want to specify libraries in programs. 
You want the application to behave consistently with the same database, 
regardless if it is working against the production environment (libraries) 
or test environment.  That is why is really important the *LIBL.  It will 
define to the program "to whom I am talking to": production or test? 


Peter Vidal 
PALL Corporation / SR Programmer Analyst, IT Development Group
10540 Ridge Rd., Ste 203, New Port Richey, FL 34654-5111
http://www.pall.com

"Courage is the strength or choice to begin a change. Determination is the 
persistence to continue in that change." 
-- Anonymous --

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