160000kb/day * 1 day/24 hours * 1 hour/3600 seconds = 1.9kb/second but I
really doubt you'll want to use a 2400 baud modem.

Dig a little deeper. What's the distribution of that 160000kb/day?  Is
80% of it between 8 & 9 AM when people come in and see the email from
you advertising the site?  If so then a more reasonable average may be
(160000kb * 80%)/hour * 1 hour/3600 seconds = 36kb/sec.  Still trivial
in terms of average bandwidth. 

But average is not what you size for.  Peak is what matters, especially
for a customer-facing app.  Let's size for 90% of your day's traffic
hits within 10 minutes: (160000kb * 90%)/10 minutes * 1 minute/60
seconds = 240kb/s.

Now we're talking substantial bandwidth.

BTW, I suggest you look hard at average page size.  Back when I was
younger and dinosaurs roamed the earth, we hand-tuned web pages to take
no more than a few seconds to load over a dialup connection.  Rarely was
a page more than 30K including both text & graphics.  Nowadays it seems
that average page size is frequently well north of 100K.


Will the web server be set up with SSL (adds CPU overhead)?  Will it be
doing compression (mod gzip; saves bandwidth)?  Depending on how the
site works, the 2GB RAM may be a little on the low end.  Considering how
cheap RAM is, even server RAM, I'd bump it to 3 or even 4GB.  Especially
on a dual-CPU machine.


John A. Jones, CISSP
Americas Information Security Officer
Jones Lang LaSalle, Inc.
V: +1-630-455-2787 F: +1-312-601-1782
john.jones@xxxxxxxxxx

-----Original Message-----
From: pctech-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:pctech-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Mike
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2006 1:24 PM
To: PC Technical Discussion for iSeries Users
Subject: Re: [PCTECH] How do I determine Server and Bandwidth Needs?

Well... it is a government site so it would be the paper and such. I
don't have any ideas on current hit information and we are working on
getting that now. The CMS that we are using has caching so I would think
most of it will end up being treated as static content. I guess it kinda
comes down to lets say we get 10000 hits per day (low I am sure, but for
easy math) and we have an average page size of 16kb. What does that
translate to in bandwidth? I can figure 160,000 kb / day but how does
that translate into a pipe size?

On 11/8/06, Walden H. Leverich <WaldenL@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Mike,

What's "heavy server load"? 50 ppl/hour, 500/minute, 5000/second? If 
you announce something to your customer base of say, 10,000 customers 
and 5% of them come see it, you're not dealing w/large numbers. If you

announce a free cruise to Tahiti during the season premier of 24 ... 
Well... <G>

There are a number of tools you can use to estimate traffic and 
performance of a site, Microsoft's own ACT isn't bad for rough
numbers.

And what happens if your site does go down? Do you need redundancy?

Finally, why in house and what does the site look like? Does it make 
sense to have the site hosted somewhere w/a big pipe to the net and 
just the data traffic over your pipe, or leave the "app" at your site 
but move all the static content (images, .js, .css, .etc.) to another 
location, either an ISP, or something like akamai.

-Walden

--
Walden H Leverich III
Tech Software
(516) 627-3800 x3051
WaldenL@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
http://www.TechSoftInc.com

Quiquid latine dictum sit altum viditur.
(Whatever is said in Latin seems profound.)


-----Original Message-----
From: pctech-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx [mailto:pctech-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx]
On Behalf Of Mike
Sent: Wednesday, November 08, 2006 11:49 AM
To: PC Technical Discussion for iSeries Users
Subject: [PCTECH] How do I determine Server and Bandwidth Needs?

So we are going to be putting up an in-house external web server 
(Windows
2003) soon. We have a server and are looking into the pipe coming in.
Where
do we start to determine the size of the pipe? There is the obvious 
(number of hits * size of pages), but what other factors do we need to

take into account? We expect a heavy server load initially with the 
announcement and would like to not have it crash the first day.

Also, I don't know the full stats on the server, but we are delivering

ASP.NET pages (via a cached source). We have 2GB of RAM and I would 
guess a dual CPU of some sort. What do you think?

--
Mike Wills
Blog - http://mikewills.name
Podcasts - http://theriverbendpodcast.com
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--
Mike Wills
Blog - http://mikewills.name
Podcasts - http://theriverbendpodcast.com
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