We are having a problem with the output on our IBM 3900 printer.

When we print multiple jobs on continuous form paper, small "copy marks" or
"job separators" are printed across the perforations so when the paper is
stacked you can tell when a new print job starts and ends.

These lines print:  ____ one for the first job,

                              _____
                              _____  for the second job,
 
                              _____
                              _____
                              _____  for the third job.

Then it starts over again 1, 2, 3 .... and so forth...

Unfortunately these marks are interfering with our post-processing equipment
and we want to turn them off.

It took several weeks for IBM to finally locate someone who understood the
printer operating system enough to 
tell it not to print the "copy marks" ... but when we send an OS/400
generated AFP file to the printer, they still 
print!

Looking over the AFP PSF, printer file and *OUTQ descriptions I can't see
anyway to influence "copy marks" at all.

Does anyone know how we might be able to STOP these little buggers from
printing on our forms?   

Kenneth 

**************************************** 
Kenneth E. Graap 
IBM Certified Specialist 
AS/400e Professional System Administrator 
NW Natural (Gas Services) 
keg@xxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Phone: 503-226-4211 x5537 
FAX:    603-849-0591 
**************************************** 



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