You wouldn't have to use WAS then :-)

In all seriousness it depends. I personally like to use the whole Java EE
stack which I don't get with Tomcat. The main problem with WebSphere
Application Server is they are always so far behind the curve. GlassFish on
the other hand is the implementation reference. Now, all that could
potentially change with Oracle now owning GlassFish, but I don't suspect it
will anytime soon if at all.

Java EE 6 eases development even more than Java EE 5 did. You get CDI for
free and you no longer have to include an interface for EJB's as part of the
EJB 3.1 specification. Also, JPA 2.0 is pretty nice. I know WAS has a
feature pack for JPA 2.0, but I don't like those feature packs at all. They
usually only give you a little of what you need. There are plenty more added
benefits in JEE 6, but those are the ones that I'm mainly interested in at
this point.

I know I sound like I'm coming down hard on WAS, but right now I think it
deserves it. I'm a bit bitter because I couldn't get JSF 2.0 running
properly along with Java EE 5 on WAS even though JSF 2.0 will run in Java EE
5. For some reason installing it breaks the EJB annotation processing and
maybe even more, but I didn't get past that. </rant>
--
James R. Perkins


On Fri, Sep 10, 2010 at 07:38, Murali Rao
<Murali.Rao@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>wrote:

We use Tomcat for windows server for servlet req/res, and WAS
implementation on i.

What is the actual reason for us to move to Glassfish if we have tomcat for
windows & WAS for i? Are there any real benefits?

Thanks, Murali.


As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.

This thread ...

Replies:

Follow On AppleNews
Return to Archive home page | Return to MIDRANGE.COM home page

This mailing list archive is Copyright 1997-2022 by midrange.com and David Gibbs as a compilation work. Use of the archive is restricted to research of a business or technical nature. Any other uses are prohibited. Full details are available on our policy page. If you have questions about this, please contact [javascript protected email address].

Operating expenses for this site are earned using the Amazon Associate program and Google Adsense.