You're correct. Not deprecated. The documentation says it is being
retained as a "legacy" class and that developers are encouraged to use
String.split instead.

Deprecated is a formal process which culminates in the referenced code
being dropped in some future release. Legacy is something milder, which
is good, because I have StringTokenizers all over my code.


-----Original Message-----
From: java400-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:java400-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of TAllen@xxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 2:58 PM
To: Java Programming on and around the iSeries / AS400
Subject: RE: String tokenizer problem

Thanks for the info. I guess the tokens were being created for a set of
character delimiters within the string rather than the entire delimiter
string. I did not see that documented anywhere.

Note that StringTokenizer is not deprecated. There is language in the
JavaDoc to use String#split but it is not deprecated.

Thanks,
Todd Allen
EDPS
Electronic Data Processing Services
tallen@xxxxxxxxxxxx





"Dan Kimmel"

<dkimmel@rjssoftw

are.com>
To
Sent by: "Java Programming on and around
the
java400-l-bounces iSeries / AS400"

@midrange.com <java400-l@xxxxxxxxxxxx>


cc


2009-09-30 15:47
Subject
RE: String tokenizer problem



Please respond to

Java Programming

on and around the

iSeries / AS400

<java400-l@midran

ge.com>









In StringTokenizer, the second String in the constructor is a set of
CHARACTER delimiters presented in the form of a string. new
StringTokenizer(someString, " ;." will break the string into tokens for
every space, semicolon, or dot contained in someString. StringTokenizer
is deprecated in favor of String.split() which takes a regex as
parameter.

-----Original Message-----
From: java400-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx
[mailto:java400-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of TAllen@xxxxxxxxxxxx
Sent: Wednesday, September 30, 2009 1:09 PM
To: Java Programming on and around the iSeries / AS400
Subject: String tokenizer problem

I'm having some trouble with the StringTokenizer. As far as I can tell
there is something wacky going on due to the + or : in the delimiter.
I have the following string:
Sep 29, 2009 7:00 PM GMT+00:00 Sep 30, 2009 7:30 PM GMT+00:00

I am using "GMT+00:00" (no quotes) as the delimiter.

The String#split method correctly splits the string in to the array
elements using a simple regex:
String[] tokens = text.split("GMT\\+00:00");

The StringTokenizer splits on the first double zero in 2009 and then
stops at the colon in the time next:
StringTokenizer t = new StringTokenizer(text, "GMT+00:00");

The 1st two tokens are:
Sep 29, 2
9 7

Has anyone seen this behavior before? Am I missing something obvious?

Thanks,
Todd Allen
EDPS
Electronic Data Processing Services
tallen@xxxxxxxxxxxx




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