Joe Pluta wrote:
I'll attach the code at the end of a simple program that invokes a
web service and prints the result. And while the Java is actually relatively readable, I raise the point that you don't look at the
code unless the generator has a bug. Other than that, you use the
high-level EGL debugger which is very powerful.

Yeah, I don't doubt it is ... I'm only curious because sometimes the EGL support functionality (i.e., development client) isn't necessarily available. Especially if the code is deployed at a customer site.

(OT: A thought that just occurred to me ... wouldn't it be great if you could embed the source for a compiled java [or derivative] class IN THE CLASS file [like you can do with ILE] to aid debugging?)

3. If #2 is correct, what are the licensing & redistribution rules
regarding the runtime libraries, if any?

None. If it's an EAR, export the EAR and run it. The rich client JavaScript is even easier, just post the generated HTML on your
favorite HTTP server.

That's interesting ... and somewhat surprising. I've observed that most (at least the ones I've looked at) third party framework providers charge a license fee for distributing any runtime components required for code generated with their tool. That's refreshing to see they didn't go this route.

service HelloService function hello(toWhom string in) returns
(string) SysLib.setRemoteUser("RUI00001", "RUI00001"); hrq
HelloRequest { Name = toWhom }; hrs HelloResponse; call "HELLO" (
hrq, hrs ); return (hrs.Salutation); end end

What's 'hrq' and 'hrs'? I'm assuming they are request and response, but where are they defined? Are they built in?

Not pretty, perhaps, but readable and again, you don't spend any time
in this.

Very not pretty, but better than some I've seen.

What about native code on the i? You've mentioned that it can generate native interactive code. I would be interested to see what that looks like (both the EGL and the generated code).

Thanks!

david



This thread ...

Follow-Ups:
Replies:

Follow On AppleNews
Return to Archive home page | Return to MIDRANGE.COM home page

This mailing list archive is Copyright 1997-2020 by midrange.com and David Gibbs as a compilation work. Use of the archive is restricted to research of a business or technical nature. Any other uses are prohibited. Full details are available on our policy page. If you have questions about this, please contact [javascript protected email address].