Booth, I don't understand how you might use .css files to alternate between languages. With .css you're dealing with styling such as "margin" and "padding" and "background-color"; but "Hello" vs. "Hola"?

-Nathan



----- Original Message -----
From: Booth Martin <booth@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: Web Enabling the IBM i (AS/400 and iSeries) <web400@xxxxxxxxxxxx>
Cc:
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 1:26 PM
Subject: Re: [WEB400] Web Application Internalization Best Practices

Have you considered putting the language-specific items in a
language_en.css file and other languages in their own language_xx.css
file with
rel="alternate stylesheet"?
That would seem fairly easy to implement and allow adding client/site
.css language files with ease.  I do this to provide different color
themes and it is fairly quick and is superb for offering the ability to
change items without a programmer being involved.






----- Original Message -----
From: "Holm, Paul" <pholm@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
To: web400@xxxxxxxxxxxx
Cc:
Sent: Monday, February 4, 2013 11:48 AM
Subject: [WEB400] Web Application Internalization Best Practices

All,

We are reevaluating our approach to I18N for web applications.  This
involves supporting multiple languages for all our browser UI labels and
messages and error messages.
Our requirements are to be Operating System and Database Independent.
Today we utilize Java and resource bundles but want to see if there are
better approaches.

What are others doing?
What are the other best practices?  Gotchas?

Thanks, Paul Holm
www.planetjavainc.com



This thread ...

Follow-Ups:
Replies:

Follow On AppleNews
Return to Archive home page | Return to MIDRANGE.COM home page

This mailing list archive is Copyright 1997-2019 by midrange.com and David Gibbs as a compilation work. Use of the archive is restricted to research of a business or technical nature. Any other uses are prohibited. Full details are available on our policy page. If you have questions about this, please contact [javascript protected email address].