Hi Jim

You describe a way of working that is similar to mine - one thing I do differently is to use the Turnover plugin - Turnover being a change management system - there are others like Aldon, Implementer, and ArCad. I end up doing most of my work in RDI, as a result.

If your research includes searching for certain text in source members, let me heartily recommend you install the iSphere plugin - I have a filter that is set for all libraries that have source files - that's upwards of 20 libraries. The search in iSphere can run over the entire filter - and it does so in seconds - it is SO much faster than the search for text that is in RDi, which is based on IBM FNDSTRPDM. There have been recent posts about the latest version of iSphere, which has lots of other tools, as well - like a message file editor, data area editor, I think a user space editor, very cool and useful stuff.

HTH
Vern

On 9/20/2016 7:48 AM, Jim Hawkins wrote:
Neill,
I am sure that you will gets lots of other responses to this. Recently, I
had the privilege of moving from WDSC to RDI. Reasons: a)The most recent
update for WDSC that I could find was about 10 years old. b)WDSC does not
play well with the RPG full free (H, F, D...specs). c) brand new Win10 PC
and no one knew where the install files/disk was for WDSC. Our BP was able
to get us significant savings over the IBM list price.

I pretty much use RDI for new all new programming and maintenance is about
50/50 between RDI and SEU (if it is a simple quick thing, I tend to find it
quicker to use SEU-but that is me. Frequently I have to research to find
that program that needs maintenance and I find SEU is easier for that task,
when I find the program and it is just a line or two of code, I am already
there).
One of my (so far) favorite features of RDI is being able to click in the
outline to a)go to, b)analyze, various components of the code (files,
fields, subroutines, etc.) (the exception to this is that conditioning
indicators do not seem to be picked up well).

I never became real comfortable with WDSC and am still learning RDI. There
are a few things that I can do in SEU that I have not figured out how to do
in the GUI based products and have not taken the time yet to research. (I
did not have these tools at previous employment). RDI opens much faster
than WDSC.

When WDSC first came out, I looked at it and thought "why?". Having used
the GUI tools for a little while, I wonder why people are not switching.

Regards,

Jim Hawkins
Programmer Analyst
Interkal LLC
Kalamazoo, MI
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
Hi Everyone

Its been a long time since I posted on any of these lists, as I have been
distracted with lots of boring .net stuff.

However we have finally moved from V5R4 to 7.1, that combined with the
possibility of a couple of trainees starting has turned my attention back to
all things IBM.

I'm looking to use a combination of qaxis HTTP API and Scott K's YAJL
wrapper to put together a POC to call one of our .net RESTFUL services. If
successful, I'd like to set the trainee's the task of using the technology
to link into various parts of our system and actually do something useful.

I'd prefer them to learn in an IDE, as there is more chance of things
sticking as they will be using Visual Studio as well, and if they are using
an IDE, then it probably should be the latest available.

On to the questions

1) Are most people using RDI now?
2) Do any still sue WDSC?
3) Do any still just use SEU

With regards to RDI from what I can see the floating license is a no
brainer, we have a lot of very talented and experienced developers who feel
more at home in SEU, but a few people that will prefer RDI. I cant see any
reason to go for the more expensive Authorised user option, does anybody
have a good reason why someone might consider it.

Thank

Neill





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