Den 22/06/10 18.38, James Perkins skrev:
I kind of see the backwards compatibility as a blessing and a curse. It's
great things work, but it also leads to code that never really gets looked
because it just works. I've seen code out there just about as old as I am. A
lot of the code I end up having to working was written in the 80's and 90's.
Joel Spolsky puts it much better than I can:

" The idea that new code is better than old is patently absurd. Old code has been /used/. It has been /tested/. /Lots/ of bugs have been found, and they've been /fixed/. There's nothing wrong with it. It doesn't acquire bugs just by sitting around on your hard drive. Au contraire, baby! Is software supposed to be like an old Dodge Dart, that rusts just sitting in the garage? Is software like a teddy bear that's kind of gross if it's not made out of /all new material/?" -- http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/fog0000000069.html (recommended read).

I understand that you mean "change code" when you say "look at code". That means you have to test and debug your changes, and document[1] them which is actually quite a bit of work if you fiddle with critical stuff.

It is ok to do all that work if you HAVE to, but why do it otherwise?


[1] more or less :) In any case you can leave it more documented than you found it.


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