Symbolic links don't work in chroot/jail environments.

Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Fri, Aug 5, 2016 at 7:24 AM, Jim Oberholtzer <midrangel@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
wrote:

Yes but why an NFS mount as opposed to a symbolic link? I don't get the
why
here. All that does is send the data through a bunch of plumbing it
would
not ordinarily need to go through.

--
Jim Oberholtzer
Agile Technology Architects


-----Original Message-----
From: MIDRANGE-L [mailto:midrange-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Aaron
Bartell
Sent: Friday, August 05, 2016 7:07 AM
To: Midrange Systems Technical Discussion
Subject: Re: Explanation of NFS and other similar features/tools

Thanks for those notes. Your scenario is from one LPAR to another and uses
the VLan to get the best performance. My scenario/need is a mount done on
the ~same~ LPAR. I use LOCALHOST and I am guessing that is as fast or
faster, would you agree?

Example of ADDMFS I use:

ADDMFS TYPE(*NFS) MFS('LOCALHOST:/QOpenSys/dir1')
MNTOVRDIR('/QOpenSys/dir2')



Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 9:30 PM, Jim Oberholtzer <
midrangel@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
wrote:

First make sure the IP scheme used is for the internal Vlan only. I
like to use wild things like 192.1.1.1. I'll set the address up so
the third octet is the vlan that is set up on the HMC and the fourth
octet is the partition number of the partition. So a vlan on
partition three, vlan four would be 192.1.3.4.

Set up the routes so they specify the internal adapters. Since that is
theoretically a routable address you don't want it getting out into
the WAN although I highly doubt it would get past the WAN router.

Set up the frames to use jumbo frames.


There's more but those are the basics.

--
Jim Oberholtzer
Agile Technology Architects


-----Original Message-----
From: MIDRANGE-L [mailto:midrange-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf Of
Aaron Bartell
Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2016 12:39 PM
To: Midrange Systems Technical Discussion
Subject: Re: Explanation of NFS and other similar features/tools

If you set up the virtual LAN between the partitions correctly

I am eyeing up the "correctly" portion of your statement as it implies
it's decently easy to do incorrectly in a single machine situation.
Do you have any pointers for me on how things should/should-not be setup?

Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 12:12 PM, Jim Oberholtzer <
midrangel@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx> wrote:

Aaron,

If you're going over the internal virtual LAN as opposed to out to
the network and back again I doubt there will be a performance
difference between partitions vs. on a single partition. (Assuming
of course both partitions have good performance to start with)

If you set up the virtual LAN between the partitions correctly you
will be approaching backplane speeds with it. Close enough that you
would not notice the difference.

--
Jim Oberholtzer
Agile Technology Architects


-----Original Message-----
From: MIDRANGE-L [mailto:midrange-l-bounces@xxxxxxxxxxxx] On Behalf
Of Aaron Bartell
Sent: Thursday, August 04, 2016 11:15 AM
To: Midrange Systems Technical Discussion
Subject: Re: Explanation of NFS and other similar features/tools

From your link: "When mounting over the local file system..."

Well, I'll be a monkey's uncle. So my use case *is* valid. I've
not tested NFS from one LPAR to another, though I'd expect that to
be slower and wouldn't have done the same use case (mapped a dir for
the purposes of running binaries and loading libxxx[.a|.so] files).



Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 10:48 AM, Vernon Hamberg
<vhamberg@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

:) I don't think one can conclude this - NFS is defined in
several
RFCs.
On the IBM i, the server is implemented by the QNFSNFSD job,
client by the QNFSBIOD - those are just separate jobs that can run
at the same
time.

I just read this in a nice KB article from IBM at
http://www-01.ibm.com/support/docview.wss?uid=nas8N1016376 (IBM
NFS Concepts and Troubleshooting). Seems a good starting point, so
that we don't have to make guesses.

If you do see a performance problem locally that you don't see
when using NFS between a couple IBM i LPARs or between the IBM i
and a Linux box, then a PMR is in order.

HTH
Vern


On 8/4/2016 10:25 AM, Aaron Bartell wrote:

Thanks for that, Charles. The end point I'll make is NFS wasn't
created with local mounts in mind**. Linux mount was created
with both
in mind.

**If it was, then there needs to be some performance tweaks
applied to defaults for it to be viable(opinion).

Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 10:12 AM, Charles Wilt
<charles.wilt@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

I'd disagree...


On both IBM i and Linnux, MOUNT is used to mount both local and
remote file systems.

Linux mount supports both NFS and SMB as protocols for remote
file systems.

IBM i mount supports just NFS. SMB support is provided by the
QNTC file system.

So the difference you saw wasn't IBM i vs Linux mount, but local
vs remote.

Charles

On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 11:00 AM, Aaron Bartell
<aaronbartell@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

One more question - are you talking about the IBM i as an NFS
client or

as

an NFS server?

The IBM i was playing both in my scenario. An NFS definition
was created outside of chroot, and the mount
destination/mapping was created inside chroot. I dug a little
into the Linux mount(n1) command and see it

doesn't

focus on the 'N' of NFS (specifically, network). That would be
my
guess
for why NFS is so slow in my scenario. IBM i's NFS would be
like Linux
mount+samba.

n1 - http://linux.die.net/man/8/mount

Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 9:53 AM, Vernon Hamberg <
vhamberg@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

wrote:

Aaron

One more question - are you talking about the IBM i as an NFS
client or

as

an NFS server?

Thanks
Vern


On 8/4/2016 8:06 AM, Aaron Bartell wrote:

I'd love to expand on it if I was knowledgeable about it, but
I am

not. I

only have results of a single scenario that caused it to not
work for

our

needs. I'd love to learn that the speed can be addressed, but
I don't
have
the time (currently) to dig into it and have instead resorted
to less expensive means (buying disk vs. cpu).

It's entirely possible that IBM's under-the-covers
implementation is similar to Linux and it's simply the IFS
being slow (and consuming

mass

CPU
in the process) that's the issue.

Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 8:00 AM, Charles Wilt
<charles.wilt@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

Aaron,

Care to expand on that? What's different?

I was under the impression that the IBM i's NFS was the same
as Linux/Unix NFS.

Charles


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 8:48 AM, Aaron Bartell <

aaronbartell@xxxxxxxxx>

wrote:

Drawbacks: It's a little more setup. And learning the
options of

EXPORTFS and MOUNT is a curve.

One more drawback that caused me to stop using them in
significant fashion... NFS is CPU intensive when used in an
IFS I/O heavy

scenario

(i.e. mapping Node.js runtime). I don't have a full
understanding

of

how
NFS works under the covers but suffice to say I learned to
not put

it

in

a

similar camp of the Linux "mount" command (which is how I
was using

it,

right or wrong).

Aaron Bartell
litmis.com - Services for open source on IBM i


On Thu, Aug 4, 2016 at 7:28 AM, Rob Berendt <rob@xxxxxxxxx>
wrote:

There are two parts to NFS. The client, and the server.

If you're familiar with QNTC then you are aware that you
can do a

WRKLNK
'/QNTC/mypcserver/mypcshare' and look at shares on various
PC's.

This

would be a client.
You can also create a 'share' using IBM i Navigator that
PC's can

access.
This would be a server.

Both QNTC and shares are comparable, but different, than NFS.
There are issues with QNTC that make some people tend to
shy away

from

it.

You use EXPORTFS (since EXPORT was already used in binder
language)

to

serve up a directory.
You use MOUNT from an IBM i client to consume what some
server

exported.
Other open systems, and even old proprietary legacy systems
like Windows, also support NFS as a client and a server.

Drawbacks: It's a little more setup. And learning the
options of EXPORTFS and MOUNT is a curve.
Pros: It works. Unlike QNTC to a system with numerous
shares

defined

that are multiple characters long, with many of the shares
having

the

first x number of characters identical.

Rob Berendt
--
IBM Certified System Administrator - IBM i 6.1 Group Dekko
Dept 1600 Mail to: 2505 Dekko Drive
Garrett, IN 46738 Ship to: Dock 108
6928N 400E
Kendallville, IN 46755 http://www.dekko.com





From: Darryl Freinkel <dhfreinkel@xxxxxxxxx>
To: Midrange Systems Technical Discussion <

midrange-l@xxxxxxxxxxxx

Date: 08/04/2016 08:07 AM
Subject: Explanation of NFS and other similar
features/tools
Sent by: "MIDRANGE-L" <midrange-l-bounces@midrange.
com>



I have always seen these but never had a need to use them
or so I

thought.

I do not have a need right now.

What and how are these tools intended to be used?

Reading a current thread on the NFS, I got curious. To
date I have

simply
used the IFS root extensively.

TIA

Darryl Freinkel
iPad
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