And that is what Sun and Oracle was trying to sell with their Network
Devices. Didn't fly, did it? :)

A (good?) multi-tier application is the display client, whether VB, web,
java, C++, that handles validation, display and communication with the
middle tier.  Middle tier holds business logic and talks to the database
system.

That is the basics of distributed applications.

The strong point for AS/400 is the fact that multi-tier computing is
unnecessary.  All the tiers reside on one box.  So, for large applications,
the cost of one AS/400 is the same (or a little more) priced for  hardware
as several database and middle tier servers to handle the same load.  I
would assume cost savings increase do to the fact of support be easier on
one machine than several individual ones with different OSes.

As the "Big Server Heist" ad says, "It will save you a bundle."

(Yeah, this is actually coming from the VB developer/Linux guy.  Goes to
show how disillusioned some people have become with the new age programming
theory.)

Adam Lang
Systems Engineer
Rutgers Casualty Insurance Company
http://www.rutgersinsurance.com
----- Original Message -----
From: "James W. Kilgore" <eMail@James-W-Kilgore.com>
To: <midrange-l@midrange.com>
Sent: Friday, December 28, 2001 5:56 PM
Subject: Re: code optimization was: Trivia: Processor MHz


<snip>
> Just imagine if every web client had to have web server code at the
desktop to
> run.  No, the server is the server, the client should not -NEED- the
> application.






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