----- Original Message -----
From: "Chris Rehm" <javadisciple@earthlink.net>

> >
> >Strings are defined as a class. All string functions, including "copy"
> >execute as calls to methods of the string class.  In RPG  the copy of a
> >string executes as a single MI CPYBLAP instruction. In C++ the same copy
> >will execute as a function call, memory alloc, byte by byte copy. Much
more
> >cpu is needed.
> >
> I'd sure advocate faster processors, but I seem to disagree with your
> logic here. I don't think a faster processor is the only solution to a
> poor compiler. I'd prefer that the software guys tie the C++ string copy
> to the MI instruction used by RPG.
>

Encapsulating a string in a class enables techniques like automatic type
conversion ( ascii to ebcdic to unicode ), all the other string functions
( scan, replace, concat ). Cpu is cheap ( or it should be ).   ( Also the
C++ template functionality works well with classes and functions )

> >
> I think there is a difference between "consumed" and "needed" and it
> might not be that it is all needed here. Maybe standard C++ and Java
> libraries should rely on MI instructions. Otherwise it seems like you
> are saying, "See, when I used it like a PC server it isn't as good as a
> PC server."

Once you start trying to optimize and mix programing models you really start
to muck things up. Either program the RPG way or the OOP way.


Steve Richter





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