• Subject: Re: What About Price vs. Performance?
  • From: mcrump@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
  • Date: Tue, 3 Apr 2001 11:11:57 -0500



Nathan,

Very good questions.  There are a couple of points to consider though.  I'm sure
this will evoke a number of responses - you may want to post this question on
the WEB400 list.  Performance can be such a obtuse discussion - there are so
many variables involved.  I'll make a couple of points (ok opinions):

1.)  Processor design - AS/400's have always been architected to move data.
Therefore, processor and memory intensive applications have not always faired
well.  The new 8xx's and 2xx's go a long way to solving this.

2.)  Workload mix and or optimization.  What other applications are being used?
What kind of AS/400 are you using?  6xx - traditional application, 7xx - getting
better for modern applications, Sxx - decent enough, etc.

3.)  Scalability.  For example we run Domino on a 730.  At low volumes the
WINTEL platform gives me better response.  However, that 730 will go a lot
longer providing the same level of response before the knee of the curve is hit.
While also running other applications I might add.....

4.)  Not to sound like I'm repeating the IBM mantra here but cost of ownership
is very critical.  Be sure to look beyond the cost of acquisition.

5.)  I still think there are some benefits in the area of security and
stability.

Michael Crump
Saint-Gobain Containers
1509 S. Macedonia Ave.
Muncie, IN  47302
(765)741-7696
(765)741-7012 f
(800)428-8642



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  |       Subject:     What About Price vs. Performance?                       |
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"Get thee to the Web".  We've been hearing that from IBM.  But I have
concerns about iSeries price vs. performance for Web applications.

I've been reviewing published performance data recently on a couple of Web
applications.  Both applications were hosted on Intel servers.  Microsoft
Windows technologies were used to develop and host the applications.

I've also been developing OS/400 based web applications lately.  The
problem, is that these Windows based Web applications perform better than
mine, and on systems that cost 1/6 that of mine.  The complexity of the
applications, and the size of the HTML responses, are comparable to mine,
but the hardware/OS price vs. performance is better by a factor of 7 to 8.

So, how can I expect the iSeries to compete as a Web application server?

Thanks,

Nathan.


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