• Subject: Re: AS/400 vs. NT(I love both NT and the AS/400)
  • From: "DAVID BULOG" <d2ba@xxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Thu, 28 Oct 1999 13:59:28 +1300

I love both NT and the AS/400--I enjoy developing AS/400 Client Server apps
with Microsoft products-which run on NT
Take a look at this.
The company I work for had the choice of continuing their 10 year FM OPs
contract with IBM .we have the largest AS/400 system in NZ.Instead the new
10 year IT outsourcing contract was won by
EDS and Microsoft in a combined deal worth 10 billion NZ(US  5 BILLION)

THIS SAYS IT ALL.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Enterprise server developers have always had to cope with feeling inferior
to their mainframe cousins. Until now. In this book, I will provide you
with the means to create an available, scalable, and secure enterprise
system. I will show you how to divide your system both logically and
physically, so as to distribute the processing and not the data - the
ultimate goal of Enterprise Architecture.

I will introduce you to my n-sphere architecture which allows you to
efficiently scale your system whilst leaving the data centralized and
focused. Using this design, I will then teach you how to construct totally
reusable 'Enterprise Caliber Data Objects' that have the ability to track
the complete history of their data, allowing for unlimited undo's. Using
these Data objects, I will show you how to efficiently construct business
objects and applications, and how to deploy them across the enterprise. All
the code in this book is available for you to download and study. 

What does this book cover?



•An important new model for enterprise development •The n-sphere enterprise
architecture - focus your processing towards the data store •Enterprise
Caliber Data Objects - and their key data handling processes •The power of
4-Dimensional Data objects •Unlimited undo's on your objects using an audit
history •MTS, IIS and SQL Server in an enterprise solution •How to build a
fault tolerant enterprise system capable of parallel processing •Separate
your business rules and reuse your Data objects to construct business
objects and components •Deploy your applications to clients over the
desktop and web using ASP and DHTML •The Object Factory Utility, which
automatically generates Data objects •Important information for enterprise
developers and system managers 

Enterprise Application Architecture with VB, ASP, MTS
ISBN:1861002580 Joseph Moniz
ASP
IIS
Visual Basic
------------------------------------------------------------------------


Summary of Contents


Chapter 1: Delivering an Enterprise
Chapter 2: Available, Scalable, and Secure
Chapter 3: Clustering & Server Farm Design
Chapter 4: Introduction to Enterprise Caliber Data Objects
Chapter 5: The Application Object
Chapter 6: The ErrCond Object
Chapter 7: The Computer Object
Chapter 8: Introduction to the 4-Dimensional Data Object
Chapter 9: The Administrative Interface
Chapter 10: Level II Objects
Chapter 11: Administering Properties
Chapter 12: Working with the Property Bag
Chapter 13: Connecting Objects
Chapter 14: Veneers, Components, and Applications
Chapter 15: Deploying Across an Enterprise
Chapter 16: Active Server Pages

Appendix A: The Code in this Book
Appendix B: Some Additional Considerations
Appendix C: Additional Code

----------
> From: boldt@ca.ibm.com
> To: MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com
> Subject: RE: AS/400 vs. NT
> Date: Thursday, 28 October 1999 04:40
> 
> 
> 
> Don wrote:
> >That's a cool story.
> >
> >My client as 14 NT Servers. I've been here two years; have never had ONE
> go
> >down.
> >
> >They have three AS/400's; had one go down in that time.
> >
> >Moral: Anecdotal evidence is worthless.
> >
> >Mike Otey -- remember him? -- writes in a recent issue of SQL Server
> >magazine of Microsoft's Terra database or whatever. It has 99.9% uptime.
> >
> >It's getting to the point much like the automobile industry: at some
> point,
> >it doesn't much matter what you buy -- the quality is all good.
> >
> >I have no "religion" concerning servers and OSes.
> >
> >Except for Linux: I have TRIED to install it on TWO systems at home with
> no
> >success. Even had a Linux "guru" try it. It ain't ready for Prime Time,
> >folks.
> 
> I can't resist replying to this.  Earlier, you say that
> anecdotal evidence is worthless, and yet you use a personal
> anecdote to dismiss Linux.
> 
> I have my own anecdotes:
> 
> Linux installed with no problems on my home machine.  And
> the upgrade from RH 5.1 to 6.1 was even easier.
> 
> I have a friend who's one of the biggest MS bigots I know.
> When he wanted to install a firewall to protect his home
> LAN, guess what he used?  Linux.
> 
> Cheers!  Hans
> 
> Hans Boldt, ILE RPG Development, IBM Toronto Lab, boldt@ca.ibm.com
> 
> 
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