• Subject: RE: Feb 29, 2000 - Snow!!
  • From: "Stone, Brad V (TC OASIS)" <bvstone@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx>
  • Date: Fri, 1 Oct 1999 15:44:25 -0500

It's late Friday, and snowing hard here in southern MN!  

We have accumulation.  I think it could even be considered a "blanket" of
snow at this point!

Bradley V. Stone
BVS/Tools
http://www.bvstools.com




> -----Original Message-----
> From: Terry Richardson [mailto:RichardsonT@orvis.com]
> Sent: Friday, October 01, 1999 2:36 PM
> To: 'MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com'
> Subject: RE: Feb 29, 2000
> 
> 
> They must have had help from space aliens.
> 
> Sorry, it's late on Friday afternoon.
> 
> Terry Richardson
> Sr. P/A
> The Orvis Company, Inc.
> 802-362-8663
> 
> 
>       -----Original Message-----
>       From:   Dan Bale [SMTP:dbale@genfast.com]
>       Sent:   Friday, October 01, 1999 12:22 PM
>       To:     MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com
>       Subject:        Re: Feb 29, 2000
> 
> 
> 
>       I just gotta ask...
> 
>       How is it that people in 1582 could figure out that an 
> earth year
> was 365.2422
>       days long?  How did they measure it with that 
> precision?  By using
> 1/10000 day
>       precision, we're talking 8.64 seconds per _year_.
> 
>       They eliminated 10 days off the calendar in October 
> 1582.  Based on
> what
>       measurement?
> 
>       BTW, IBM date data type accepts 10/10/1582 as a valid 
> date.  Maybe
> we should ask
>       them to fix that???  <g>
> 
>       So many questions...
> 
>       - Dan Bale
> 
>       ________________________ Original Messages
> ___________________________
> 
>       From: dhandy@isgroup.net (Douglas Handy)
>       Subject: Re: [Feb 29, 2000]
> 
>       >The Gregorian calendar had just been introduced that 
> century(!?!?
> or was
>       >it the one before?)
> 
>       According to Paul Conte's infamous date routines, the 
> dates skipped
>       were Oct 5, 1582 thru Oct 14, 1582.  It could be noted that his
>       routines ("The Last Date Routines You'll Ever Need") 
> return these as
>       invalid dates.
> 
>       ------------------------------
> 
>       Date: Thu, 30 Sep 1999 10:23 +0700
>       From: "Harry D. Angkasa" <harry@bngtw.bniaga.co.id>
>       Subject: Re: Feb 29, 2000
> 
>            The Sun goes around the globe are 365.2422 days. To make it
> easier
>            Gregorius made 365 for a year. For February, he 
> made 28 days
> for
>            February, and 29 days for every 4 years to make 
> correction. The
>            average days for 4 years would be 
> (365+365+365+366)/4 = 365.25
> days
>            per year. It is not so accurate, isn't it? .
>            That is why he made another rule :
>            - 365 days for every 100 years, even though it can 
> be divide by
> 4.
>            - 366 days for every 400 years.
>            That rule will make a correction of minus 3 days 
> for every 400
> years,
>            or -3/400 = -0.0075. With this correction, 1 year 
> become 365.25
> -
>            0.0075 = 365.2425
> 
>            He ignored the different value of 0.0003 days.
> 
>       ------------------------------
> 
>       From  The Origin of Leap Year
> 
>       Pope Gregory XIII took action in the year 1582 by
>       cutting 10 days off the month of October and devising
>       the Gregorian Calendar, the one we still use today.
>       The last day of the Julian Calendar was Thursday,
>       October 4th, 1582, followed by Friday, October 15th,
>       1582. Clavius' solution was to make no Centennial
>       Year a leap year unless it was divisible by 400. Since
>       1600 was coming up, it was noted that it would be a leap
>       year, whereas 1700, 1800 and 1900 would not. The year
>       2000 will be a Centennial Leap Year. He also realized
>       that this solution slightly overcorrected the calendar.
>       Therefore, any year that is divisible by 4,000 would be
>       called a Common Year and would not be a leap year.
>       This has the effect of bringing the calendar back in line.
>       There will not be a Common Centennial Year until the
>       year 4000.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
>       +---
>       | This is the Midrange System Mailing List!
>       | To submit a new message, send your mail to
> MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com.
>       | To subscribe to this list send email to
> MIDRANGE-L-SUB@midrange.com.
>       | To unsubscribe from this list send email to
> MIDRANGE-L-UNSUB@midrange.com.
>       | Questions should be directed to the list owner/operator:
> david@midrange.com
>       +---
> +---
> | This is the Midrange System Mailing List!
> | To submit a new message, send your mail to MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com.
> | To subscribe to this list send email to MIDRANGE-L-SUB@midrange.com.
> | To unsubscribe from this list send email to 
> MIDRANGE-L-UNSUB@midrange.com.
> | Questions should be directed to the list owner/operator: 
> david@midrange.com
> +---
> 
+---
| This is the Midrange System Mailing List!
| To submit a new message, send your mail to MIDRANGE-L@midrange.com.
| To subscribe to this list send email to MIDRANGE-L-SUB@midrange.com.
| To unsubscribe from this list send email to MIDRANGE-L-UNSUB@midrange.com.
| Questions should be directed to the list owner/operator: david@midrange.com
+---

This thread ...


Follow On AppleNews
Return to Archive home page | Return to MIDRANGE.COM home page

This mailing list archive is Copyright 1997-2019 by midrange.com and David Gibbs as a compilation work. Use of the archive is restricted to research of a business or technical nature. Any other uses are prohibited. Full details are available here. If you have questions about this, please contact [javascript protected email address].