That's bringing back some old mainframe (VSE) memories (and trying to reach
that far back is fuzzy) ---

It used to be ---  that character was for the old forms control buffers /
printer control tapes (at least that's what I remember).

Those hard assignments / etc can still be done --- but with a ton more
coding ---- I suggest you check the info center on print files and DDS
.........

We typically do not do anything with printer files (except override the
width, etc) ---- we have purchased products which can do overlays / merges
for special forms design, etc........

Dale Nieswiadomy

Livingston County Information & Technology Services
(585) 243-7113

dnieswiadomy@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx



                                                                           
             "Michael                                                      
             Rosinger"                                                     
             <mrosinger@cciws.                                          To 
             com>                      cobol400-l@xxxxxxxxxxxx             
             Sent by:                                                   cc 
             cobol400-l-bounce                                             
             s@xxxxxxxxxxxx                                        Subject 
                                       [COBOL400-L] printer control        
                                       character in print file records     
             11/02/2006 07:37                                              
             AM                                                            
                                                                           
                                                                           
             Please respond to                                             
             COBOL Programming                                             
                  on the                                                   
               iSeries/AS400                                               
             <cobol400-l@midra                                             
                 nge.com>                                                  
                                                                           
                                                                           




This is related to my other post concerning print lines greater than 132...

In the mainframe world, there is a COBOL compiler option (ADV/NOADV) which
deals with the placement of printer control characters for print lines. If
ADV is specified, the compiler adds one byte to the record length to
account
for the printer control character. ADV is only meaningful if you use
WRITE...ADVANCING in the source code. If NOADV is in effect, the assumption

is that the print line has already reserved a byte for the printer control
character.

I've searched through what I can find are the available compiler options
for
COBOL/ILE and I don't see anything comparable to ADV/NOADV.

How is the printer control character handled on the iSeries? Is this
something the average iSeries COBOL program needs to be concerned with?

--
Regards,

Michael Rosinger
Systems Programmer / DBA
Computer Credit, Inc.
640 West Fourth Street
Winston-Salem, NC  27101
336-761-1524
m rosinger at cciws dot com


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